Laura: Hello.
Welcome to the Creative ID Podcast. My name is Laura Ramie and I'm your host. This podcast is about instructional design, the vast profession involved in creating instruction whether it's job aids, in person trainings or e-learning. In this podcast I will be interviewing creatives: artists, designers, animators, videographers, and getting there takes on how the creative process can meld with design for learning. Today I'm joined by Dylan Mahood, a motion designer and video editor in Austin, Texas. He's also an Evangelist for Zoho and has experience making customer education and tutorials and things like that.
So we're gonna discuss motion design today. Um and so maybe we can start out by talking about how how do you describe your motion design work? Like do you what kind of projects have you usually created?
Dylan:
Um Yeah I guess do you mean like for Zoho what kinds of things have I created or just in general at large?
Laura:
Yeah maybe what you've created for Zoho and then also um what you create freelance as well.
Dylan:
Sure. Um yeah so for Zoho. It's a software company and every software company that I know of is looking for people who can make video content to help teach their users or the customers how to use their software and how to get the most out of using it. So a lot of what I do is what we just call customer education um because we're just trying to teach people what is the software capable of and how can it help them. Um so rather than just showing like a screen recording of just the software, which often isn't super interesting looking um to make the videos more engaging, I will try to like film myself, so I have like a talking head set up, but then I'll animate things over that, so I'll have my head side by side with the software, maybe I'll like animate some arrows pointing things out or I'll try to like illustrate something that's more conceptual, not showing the software at all in order to help people just kind of understand what I'm talking about and to just make it like less of,
I don't know, just like a boring head in a floating area talking at you for too long because attention spans are short and I think that's why motion graphics can be really helpful for companies,
is that they're always trying to teach people and capture an audience and you need to keep it interesting.
Laura:
Yeah, so it's like mixing it up and gaining attention.
Dylan:
Yeah, definitely.
Laura:
What programs do you usually use to create motion design?
Dylan:
For me, it's pretty much all done in After Effects, which I think is what a lot of people are using, there's a little bit of Photoshop sometimes. But yeah, it's pretty much all uh it's all done in After Effects.
Laura:
Well, After Effects um looks like a super powerful program. Um like I've just dabbled with it, just a little bit to know like whoa, this is amazing.
Dylan:
Yeah, it's an extremely versatile application. Um When I first started learning to use it, it just had such an overwhelming amount of controls and things to look at that. I compared it to like flying a plane. Um like when you look at the cockpit of a plane and you just see all those like dials and buttons and switches and you're just like holy crap, like what does all of this stuff do? And it's definitely the kind of thing that you can just never stop learning. Like there's people who have been using After Effects, like since it came out and they still are learning things about it.
Laura:
Oh yeah. Um Well you kind of started though with a video production background, right? Like you were, were you you were doing video editing before you were learning motion design right?
Dylan:
Um Yes and no, I actually, when I first started learning to edit videos, I took an extremely strange path um where I feel like a lot of people, maybe they'll start doing something on iMovie or like Windows Movie Maker and then they'll like graduate to Premiere or Final Cut and then maybe they'll go to After Effects and I skipped the part where you go to Final Cut. And so I went from like just messing around in iMovie, which is like super like anyone can do, it's very easy to learn. Um In most cases you probably don't even really need to watch a tutorial to really get started. Uh I went from that just straight into After Effects which is a very crazy thing to do and I don't recommend anyone else try the same approach. But yeah, it's because I was interested in doing special effects and that's actually how I got started with. It is more to do special effects than to do motion graphics.
Laura:
Yes, okay so special effects for like live action movies.
Dylan:
Yeah so when I started learning After Effects, I was like in high school and at the time there was this really popular um like tutorial creator named Andrew Kramer and he had just done all these incredible tutorials on how to do special effects in After Effects and to this day everybody who is like in the motion graphics industry still was like Oh, Andrew Kramer is like After Effects God or like he's how I got started and there's like certain tutorial creators just within the motion graphics world that become like a celebrity in their own right. And he is definitely one of them.
Laura
Are all of his tutorials still on YouTube?
Dylan:
Um Yeah, so he he put all of his tutorials on his website which is called Videocopilot.net and these days they might also be on YouTube and his tutorials were you know really like, it was like doing Hollywood type effects which was like the pole end so it was like you know you can watch this 45 minute video and maybe buy a pack of Andrew Kramer's like stock footage that he sold and you can then do a video of like lightning blowing up a building and the fire burning on the street below. And it was like, whoa, you could do some really crazy stuff with this.
Laura:
So um so so we talked about the kind of motion graphics that you were making for Zoho. Um And then your freelance projects, Do they, are they a lot different or are there some similarities?
Dylan:
So yeah, most of my freelance experience is also in the tech world. And so I feel like for a lot of it, it's a lot of tech companies are looking for similar things. Um Tech companies as far as I know,
usually aren't paying a freelancer to do like tutorial type things unless it's like maybe one or two like really high profile ones. Um That would be like the getting started video that's like embedded in their product. Once you start using the software, most of the time, what they would pay a freelancer for is more of like a product explainer video. Um which is like its own like category in the motion graphics industry at this point. And so a product explainer is like a 1 to 2 minute video. Usually it goes on the landing page for a um SAS application and it's just like often it'll have like character animation in it. Um And it's just to explain like what does the product do, how can it help the customer? That's probably like one of the biggest things, The other thing is um like social ads, so those are much shorter pieces of content. Um and I haven't done too much social stuff, but I have done like a product explainer recently. And yeah, I would say those are the two biggest categories that tech motion graphics jobs usually land in.
Laura:
Okay. I realized that an explainer video, like the way that I defined an explainer video since I'm coming from an education background is uh like oh it's like explaining how the water cycle works or like, you know, it's like explaining an educational content like used for class material. And then I realized like, oh there's this whole like marketing element to it too, so that was kind of like a new definition for me, but that's good to add the product to the front.
Dylan:
Yeah, I think um I think it's interesting that you bring that up because I feel like in tech this is like there's a lot of like weird tension where there will be like we want a video that does this and I'll be like, okay, so who is your target audience? Is it like a lead? Who is evaluating your product or is it somebody who's already signed up and is like paying to use your product. In a lot of times,
they actually, I don't think I've ever gotten a straight answer of like, it's just gonna be one of those camps. Um And so there's like this weird like blurring between like the education I give somebody to like teach them how and the education I give someone to understand why, right? So it's like they need to understand why to buy and how to start using it kind of all at the same moment. Um And it can be challenging to like strike the right balance of achieving those two different goals in one video, right?
Laura:
That's kind of a lot for one video to accomplish in two minutes, like I'm sure it's a lot of, so now, okay, now I'm really curious about the process of creating like, let's say the process of creating this explainer video, like let's say I come to Dylan and I'm like Dylan, I need an explainer video, like what's your first question?
Dylan:
Oh my gosh. Um That's a that's a good question. Uh I think it would really depend on like what a client came to me with because some clients are going to come with a much more fleshed out idea of how they want it to look and like they already have their scripts completely written um and others are gonna come kind of like what you just said, where they'll just be like, we want to do an explainer, tell us what to do. Um So yeah, I mean, I think the first question to settle is just like, you know, who is going to watch it? What is your goal? Like what how are you going to measure success with this? Um How long do you want it to be? And then after that it gets into, you know, you have to you have to kind of get an idea of the budget and the timeline to answer some of these questions because it might be the maybe the best way to explain it is to have like a character who's walking through and talking to the viewer and jumping from scene to scene. That takes a lot of time. Each scene takes a bunch of time to illustrate. Character animation takes a lot longer than more abstract types of animation. And so if a company doesn't have like the time for that or the budget for that, then you have to adjust what you're going for.
Laura:
Mm hmm.
Dylan:
So yeah. I don't know. I think it's there's a lot of back and forth that would go into figuring out the next step.
Laura:
And then I imagine, so in what I'm learning about in instructional design, there's all of these kind of steps to the design process. You know, like it's like first, you know, we need to do a needs assessment and and then do like a learner analysis. Um And you know, figure out like what our learners like what are their preferences and how do they learn, what do they already know. Um do you kind of do some of those beginning steps, like you mentioned like a target audience, are you doing like a target audience analysis or like, um, are you making like learner personas or like, um are there any of those kind of design documents that that you often make?
Dylan:
So freelance, not really because that's kind of like that, that's I think for the company to know and to tell me, and I might have to ask them for that, but it's not my job to know who their customer is really, but at Zoho yeah, absolutely. If we decide to create like a new set of videos, we will start by planning it out and trying to decide like what is the scope of this? Um what knowledge are we assuming they all the viewer already has, what knowledge do we want them to have by the end? Um and how are we going to deliver the content? And uh, you know, unfortunately at Zoho, we're kind of like a move fast and break things type company. Um so it's like, I do my best to, to kind of like plan that out in advance, but it's usually hard to like get a clear idea of exactly who the customer is or like have these things, like really neatly planned out ahead of time most of the time, I think, um there's there's a bit more of a guessing game uh in our company at least.
Laura:
Okay, so then, okay, so let's say for this freelance explainer video project, they have provided you uh with an analysis of of what they want accomplished and who their audience is. So after that,
what what would you do next?
Dylan:
I think the next thing, I would want to try and get the script as close to finished as possible before I started animating. But I think what I would do is start with mood boards, um once the large questions have been settled then, and we can get more narrow and start thinking about the style of the video and what's actually going to be like visually included in the video.
Laura:
How would you define a mood board?
Dylan:
So a mood board is like a collection of artwork that has like a similar style um or intention, I guess to the video that you want to create. Um and it helps you guide like the uh the art style and just the overall vibes of the video that you want to have at the end. Um and usually what that looks like is just like one one page or a couple of pages with some artwork laid out in a aesthetically pleasing grid. And then you, when you present that to a client, um you wouldn't just send it to them and just be like, here look at this, you would try to have like a call with them and walk them through it and explain like okay there's like a drawing of the potato with a little guy on it. Why is why am I looking at this right? It's like well I like the texture that's on the potato and the way the line work and this little guy I think could be like a good approach for you know you have to explain what it all really means.
Laura:
So it's kind of like you're starting to pitch the style of the video.
Okay so you have a mood board and a finished script. What do you do next?
Dylan:
Um So you might have to end up making multiple mood boards. There might be some back and forth about that but once a client has like agreed with you on the vision that you've laid out in the mood board. Um then the next step would be to create style frames. And so style frames are basically just you try to draw out a pretty close to finished looking frame from different scenes in the video. And so it's basically kind of like I guess like a story board. But I think a storyboard is usually implies like more frames are drawn. Um But the style frames are more just like a few glimpses of like what the finished video would look like in still frames. Um And then if you get those approved and you also you use the style frames to help plan out things like how how will we transition from one part to the next. Um Do the visual ideas kind of like make sense when we see it like laid out. You know if there's a thing in this scene, how are we going to get it out before we go to the next scene or back into the end scene? It helps you kind of like visualize that kind of thing. Um But once the style frames have been approved then you can start animating. Um And from there it's pretty much the client has agreed to a vision and you're just trying to execute it.
Laura:
When I was researching motion design, I found this term for a uh it was like a story board but it was like an animated storyboard.
Dylan: Oh, an animatic.
Laura:
Yeah. Do you ever make those?
Dylan:
I have not done an animatic. I think for like a for a larger, I don't think I've done like longer, larger projects that would really call for that. But yeah, for a big project, I probably would want to do that.
Laura:
Awesome.
Dylan:
Yeah and an animatic. I think to me it feels like kind of dark art because I haven't tried it yet. But it's just like the thing that's hard about the animatic is you have to you're basically doing a rough animation of the video. So it's really hard to decide what level of detail should be included in that animation to convince the client this is good without spending way too much time. And that's a I think kind of a difficult line to walk.
Laura:
Yeah and then uh and then you you create your animation which I imagine takes the longest time of all of this. Although I don't know maybe you spend like a lot of time with those style frames if you keep getting like revisions right?
Dylan:
Yeah. In my experience the animation is takes the longest. Um And I think like the process I laid out will really like vary from project to project. So like the explainer video I just did, they kind of already had like a pitch deck for this uh software that the company was selling. And so I didn't have to design much of like a mood board or um style frames because they already had like some visual ideas in that. And so for that client it was really just talking through in like a meeting, how can we take this slide deck and convert these visual ideas into like an animated thing that can just live on your website.
Laura:
Cool. And then once you have your created animation are edits like not allowed or like the clients probably would be it would be bad form if they were like, oh wait actually I want to change that.
Dylan:
Yeah, so for motion graphics clients, I mean I think this kind of goes for any freelance job I guess. But like clients are notorious for giving you last minute changes. Um so like the process I described of like, yeah, they've agreed to the vision and then I just do it. That never really happens. Uh It's, that's like the ideal of how it's supposed to happen. But usually there's revisions throughout and like the last video I did. I think like the final version of the video I sent them was like version seven or something. Um and different people have different ways of dealing with that.
Some people will like make a really strict agreement up front that there's only like this many rounds of revisions and like any more and you have to like renegotiate. Um but you have to, you have to kind of just decide what your approach is going to be and stick with it for how you negotiate those things.
Laura:
With the prospect of making motion design. It kind of looks to me like it's easier than ever. Because there is so much high powered software. And even like, you know, the web apps that will just let you make animated videos. Um But I mean that's me And I'm like not not making motion graphics. Do you think that it is easier than ever? Or is it still like a very grueling time consuming process?
Dylan:
Mm hmm. I think both. I think it's very grueling and time consuming to get right. Um but it is like yeah, the tools keep advancing. There are things that get easier about it every day. Like there's um you know 10 years ago, I don't think there was nearly as many designers who were just like drawing things on an iPad with an Apple pencil and the idea that you could like draw something digitally and have it just kind of like ready to go and you're not scanning any artwork. Uh And you can see like what you're drawing as you draw it versus using like a tablet where the screen and the drawing pad are separate from each other. Like that's a big change that's happened in the last 10 years. I think like there's also AI is starting to like enter the space a lot more. And you know,
we've seen like the early signs of like these AI things where you can just like type in something and it will generate like 100 different animations that match what you have entered. And so like that thing is like kind of scary for motion designers. Um Yeah, but then there's also like AI assistance that can be really nice. Um It's like one example is Adobe released this feature in Premiere where you can use AI to shorten a like a music track. So if you're asked to make a minute long explainer video and they want you to do the sound too, which I find a lot of companies do ask for.
I find it pretty hard because to me like being a good sound designer and a motion designer, very different skill sets and so I have to dig through all of these sites that have like royalty free music you can buy and try to find one that fits. But then you might find one that's like the right tone and everything and that takes a long time to find. But if it's 10 seconds off from your animation you have to decide what to do and Adobe made this thing. So you could find a song like that and just re-time it with AI and it will like figure out which part of the song can be cut to make it still sound like it's one coherent piece of music which is pretty cool.
Laura:
Yeah, that's that saves you a lot of time.
Dylan:
Yeah it was manually cutting, it can be pretty challenging.
Laura:
Okay. Yeah, that's a great example of um yeah, like a tool, like an advance in technology that helps the designer but doesn't necessarily like eliminate them from the equation.
Dylan:
Yeah of course sound designers might not like it.
Laura:
I want all the creative folks to have jobs.
Dylan:
Me too.
Laura:
I love sound designers.
Dylan:
It would be great if if every video they just had enough budget that they could just hire someone to do custom music every time. I think a lot of times they don't have a budget for that. So they're just expecting you to buy something already made.
Laura:
Okay. Yeah wow. Well this is this is really enlightening. Like it's like really fun to hear about a different creative process than I usually work in. So now we will move on to a new segment,
the "Inspiration Corner" where myself and my guest will pick out a piece to share as exemplary design. So I can start, I chose a video by Ted Ed and Ted Ed is such a repository of incredible animation. Like have you looked at all of the Ted Ed videos?
Dylan:
No, I had no idea that there was so many nicely animated videos for them, but I definitely want to check more of them out. You picked a great example there.
Laura:
So good. Um All of them. It was hard choosing one, but one of my favorites is a lesson about synesthesia and it's called "What color is Tuesday? exploring synesthesia", you can find a link to this video in the show notes And uh this video. So it was like going into like what is synesthesia? And it's the neurological trait where I guess like 4% of the population has this trait which sounds like a gift where like you can smell numbers and taste colors and like you're so it's like that kind of like the senses are like cross-wired. It was just like so cool. Um And this video, I thought it was just like the concept, like I really liked the concept where they have like a deck of playing cards and they use stop motion and they use like real life like hands to pick out cards in this deck. Like you know one card might have like the definitions and and then they have like illustrations on the cards where there are giving examples of real um people. Well I don't know maybe they're not real but like example people and their um uh their experiences um where you know, they talk about like somebody like prefers blue tasting foods like spinach. Um It's like that's so cool. They'll have like an illustration of the guy and illustration of spinach and blue. Um And I just thought that the cards were so ingenious because it was a way that they can like present the genetics and kind of these like combinations of like the senses and colors and letters. Um and then like probabilities to like um. And then the backs of the cards, like all the details were so great.The backs of the cards were like like D.N.A. patterns like oh yeah and it it just kind of conveyed the the idea of a magic trick um and how synesthesia is kind of magical and super fun and interesting. Although I don't know maybe it's also like can be a burden to people who have it, but I just I'm like intrigued.
Dylan:
Um Yeah, I don't know if I would want the word "college" to taste like sausage, like the one guy or somebody in their example.
Laura:
Yeah. And one of the coolest things about this video is that there's a behind the scenes video about how they made it. Um and they show the planning process, so they show their animatic.
Um and then they revealed some of their secret tricks, like they use green screen so that like they have a wooden background and that is not actually there, that's green screen. Um And then they used green play dough as a prop to hold up the cards. Um So they are like in view of the camera. So yeah, just top notch. I just, I love that video.
Dylan:
So are the cards like stuck to the green screen with some play dough? Oh my gosh, so those are real shadows.
Laura:
Yeah, they are real shadows. Um so I think it's super impressive and yeah, when they shuffle the cards that is done step by step, like that is not like real time shuffling. That stop motion shuffling. Yeah, I love, I highly recommend the Ted Ed lessons, they are so good.
Dylan:
Yeah, the cards were a really creative way and I think you made a lot of good points. I love what you said about how it kind of makes you think of like a magic trick and yeah, it just allows them to have so many different ways to explain synesthesia, It's fantastic.
Laura:
So, do you want to talk about your pick uh for exemplary motion design?
Dylan:
So I just choose this video by this channel, which I'm probably gonna butcher this name, but I think it's pronounced Kurzegesagt, um which is a German word that means "in a nutshell." Um and the video is called "We Will Fix Climate Change." And this channel is just amazing because they do all like all their videos are animated and they're all just like super colorful, but they're done with like this really flat like vector artwork style um which I think is like kind of what's been in vogue for a while in motion design because it's like it has a lot of benefits and it's kind of like fast to make. Um but I think this channel Kurzegesagt uh just does such a good job with that style. I think they're the best example of it and like their color choices, I think really make them stand apart. Um The other thing that's so great about this is that, you know, they've taken this video about climate change and I think the first like third of it or half of it is definitely kind of like a bummer because climate change is really hard to talk about. Um it's really challenging to get people to watch something about it because it's just so like upsetting to even think about um but of course they, you know, you know, from the title that it's like a positive video, we will fix climate change, but what I think is so great though is that all of the characters are birds, so they have birds playing people um and that I think allows them to enter this like really dark topic and this thing that's like pretty controversial for a lot of people and just like make it more easy to digest and less like tense. So like when they talk about like these companies that aren't doing anything, you know, they have like these evil looking birds that are just like the oil executives who are like standing near their smokestacks and stuff. Um And you know, I think it they took something very serious but they found a way to like kind of, I don't know, make it less scary um and it's easier to talk about that way and I think that's really clever.
Laura:
Yeah, this video is a testament to what can be achieved through motion graphics. I agree. The title is well chosen for encouraging viewers to watch it.
Dylan:
Yeah, I know it is great and it's amazing like this, the output that They have, like each of their videos, a lot of them are like 10 minutes, 15 minutes long and That's a significant difference to animate something 10 minutes long versus like a two minute explainer, so I don't know how they are so productive, but they're a team, they're like a studio team. Yeah, they must be, I don't know too much about how they actually operate. I know I think they originally we're just creating videos in German and they had like some amount of public funding um but they have like one of the Top 400 Most subscribed English YouTube channels now which is no small feat and yeah I think they've they've just taken that like flat 2D Vector art and just done like the most incredible videos that you could do with that style I think.
Laura:
Yeah I found that so there are like a lot of flat elements like the characters are flat but actually in like the backgrounds and um you know some of the objects, there's a bit more shading and some atmospheric perspective. It's like really impressive how they mix flat and dimensional. It might be interesting to talk about more about styles um because it definitely seems like there's, I can kind of list like a handful of styles that I most commonly see. Like you know there's like that white board style of like you know just line drawings. Um And then there's the style of the two dimensional vectors. Um you know simple, graphical. Um And then there's like the the style of more like cartoon based uh but still pretty flat um that you might see in like more like business leaning like business training.
Dylan:
Yeah the "house style."
Laura:
What do you call it?
Dylan:
The house style that's just kind of like a joke because that style is so ubiquitous, um, I was listening to a motion design podcast recently and I think they called it the house style and uh, I think that style has likely reached a tipping point because I've seen like, I saw a TikTok recently where somebody was like doing a tear down of that style and like why is this everywhere? And how can we stop it basically. And I think it's just kind of like reached an age where it's like, okay, this has become too, it's been around long enough that it's just going to be out of date and the next thing we'll replace it probably, but I don't know that style is also like so popular because, um, it does have a lot of advantages for the companies that are doing it. And one of the examples is like, if you're a big tech company, you may be working with a lot of different artists, but if you want to have a consistent look, it's a style that most motion designers can do. Um, so you can keep things consistent even across different designers. Um, it also has the advantage of like a lot of it has, um, okay, they have like really weird proportions on the characters that are like really unrealistic and I think that allows you to kind of like get away with more. Um, because if you're using really realistic proportions, then your animation has to look really, really good in order to be to sell it.
Laura:
Um Yeah, otherwise it's like Uncanny Valley, it's like there's something wrong with it but I can’t put my finger on it.
Dylan:
But yeah, like you'll notice if a walk cycle is sloppily done, you'll notice it a lot more with a realistic character than with one where like their legs take up like 80% of their body. Um Yeah, you can get away with like a really cartoony walk cycle, but it's also like there's so there are so many advantages to doing it just like from an economic perspective, like It's really easy to make replaceable parts for the characters so you can design one character and then just do like 10 different heads for it and it's really easy to swap them out. I wonder if like I was just going to say, I think people are like reaching a point where their audiences are starting to kind of tire of it and that may spell doom for the house style.
Laura:
Oh no, So Dylan, do you have a preferred style that you work in?
Dylan:
Um Yeah, that's a good, good question. I think, not really. I feel like I end up doing something kind of different every time. And I think that's just because I don't feel like I'm super experienced yet, but after I have been freelancing all the time for a longer period. I think that I will probably develop more of a style.
Laura
Probably when you are as a motion designer, you do kind of want to have a toolbox full of different looks right? Because there's not going to be a one size fits, all I imagine.
Dylan:
I mean, I don't know, I think that's actually something that the motion graphics community like endlessly debates is should you specialize in one style that becomes like your brand or should you be a generalist? And I feel like a lot of the things that I've seen have lately, people have been more on the side of like you should specialize um and that's how you'll like find more work because people see you're always doing this look and they want that look, then they'll come to you, but I think that maybe that is a good idea.
Laura:
Yeah, maybe it depends on where you are in your career, like maybe you know, you you start as kind of a generalist and then you gradually fill that specialist area.
Dylan:
I think it's like very, um, for a lot of people that can be really satisfying to become a specialist because I think they just build like a lot of confidence in that one look. Um they can get really good at it and it makes them faster too so they can get more things done.
Laura:
Oh, so cool. Well I I appreciate motion design so much like I feel like I like new insights into the art form.
Dylan:
Yeah, I mean I feel like just in general, the economy has been pushing more people to become generalists in like a lot of fields, I don't know if that's true in every field, but you know like even working at Zoho I feel like I've had to be so much of a generalist um where I'm like a videographer, but I also do motion graphics, but I also like travel around and presented events and I also like write and edit like marketing copy and like work with teams to have web pages built and like that's a lot of different roles to wear or hats to wear all of those. Could be our just separate, could be separate jobs. Yeah, and I think, I don't know, maybe it's just tools have made people more um productive and so there's like more freedom to do that, or you can look at it as like there's more pressure to make people become generalists, so. Yeah, I don't know.
Laura:
Yeah I I have noticed that, I mean maybe like tools have like democratized the arts and crafts. But like it's a lot easier to be a content creator, I think like um because there are so many tools out there that kind of streamlined the process for you, which is cool, but then also it's like well how do you stand out then, or like um yeah how do you rise to your craft? It's still really impressive when someone DIY's something without a template.
Dylan:
Definitely. Yeah and I think um you know that always being like a real craft person, a real artist like always will have value and you know like in motion graphics um there will be like certain tutorials that just like blow up and go viral. And then motion designers, like more senior motion designers will always gripe about how like yeah everybody's got like whatever tutorial in their demo reel, like I've seen this like as soon as I see it, I know it's from that tutorial and I just like I'm less interested in their reel after evaluating them, but um you know the person who first makes that tutorial though, like they clearly like came up with an idea that is like really good if they've like developed this way of like oh here's how you can do something really cool and not that much time.
And I developed like this really like unique approach to solving this problem. Um But knowledge just spread so fast.
Laura:
Maybe that is the what we should aim for is making that piece of knowledge that just like spreads through its ingenuity and out-of-the-boxness. Well um we're about out of time. Um and thank you so much, Dylan for joining me, This has been an amazing discussion.
Dylan:
Thank you for having me.
Laura:
So I will share a link to your portfolio and folks can check out your awesome demo reel. Um and then we'll have links to the videos that we discussed. Also, I'm looking for more guests for this show. If you are a creative, working in an instructional design capacity, please reach out if you would be interested in being a guest on a future episode. I’m Laura Ramie, your host. Stay tuned for the next episode of the Creative ID Podcast.

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